A Day In Black History

President Barack Obama Visits Philadelphia with Vice President Joe Biden along with Philadelphia's own Roots Crew! Izzo Ya'Know of 100.3 The Beat in Philadelphia was reporting live.

On January 18, 1958 the first African American played for the NHL. Read the story of Willie O'Ree here.

January 4, 1976 opened America's eyes to the unlawful acts that the FBI was conducting against black militant groups. Read the report findings and see senate hearing video here.

The legendary Jackie Robinson made history on April 15, 1947 when he took his place on the field with the Dodgers. Let's go back in time and follow the career of Jackie Robinson.

Most Americans best remember Marian Anderson for her conscience-grabbing concert at the Lincoln Memorial on Easter Sunday, 1939 after she was denied the use of Constitution Hall, an arena that, from 1935 to 1952, opened its doors to white artists only. First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, appalled at the Hall's racist action, opened the Lincoln Memorial for Anderson's concert. As Abraham Lincoln's statue watched over her from behind, Anderson gave an extraordinary performance that will go down in history as one of the most dramatic civil-rights spectacles ever. See footage of this historic event here.

Mamie Smith was the first to record a blues record back in 1920. She paved the way for all future musicians of those times. Take a walk back with us as we celebrate Mamie Smith.

On February 11th, 1990, South African political prisoner and anti-Apartheid leader Nelson Mandela was freed from prison on Robben Island after 27 years of imprisonment. He became president of the country in 1994 and held the position for five years.

In the summer of 1908, the country was shocked by the account of the race riots at Springfield, Illinois. Here, in the home of Abraham Lincoln, a mob containing many of the town's "best citizens," raged for two days, killed and wounded scores of Negroes, and drove thousands from the city. And because of this the NAACP was born.

In 1928 Oscar DePriest became the first African American congressman elected to the House of Representatives from a northern state and a national symbol for racial pride. Read more on Oscar DePriest here.

Remember Rodge from "What's Happening", and Thelma from Good Times? Well here is a gallery that pays tribute to those lost but not forgotten African American TV Sitcoms.

 Black music is in fact America's original music, and the Spirituals-Blues-Jazz-Gospel-Charleston-Twist-HipHop gift is the foundation not only of  rhythm and blues but also of Broadway and The Grammys. Check out three of the most major moments in Black Music History.

In 1920, African-American Elijah McCoy opened the Elijah McCoy Manufacturing Company which led to early innovations in manufacturing and automotive machinery.