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Regina King directs Viola Davis Julius Tennon and Genesis Tennon for W Magazine

Source: Andre D. Wagner / W Magazine

There are only a few actresses who make up Hollywood’s elite, and Viola Davis is definitely one of them. The Suicide Squad actress celebrates her 56th birthday today, and you know we had to give her the flowers she deserves. Not only is she one of the strongest black female leads killing it in Hollywood, but she is also a humanitarian. Davis recently was announced as the newest spokesperson for No Kid Hungry- a national campaign to end childhood hunger in America. That is why we had to celebrate her birthday. Here are four times Viola changed television as we know it! 

Related: Regina King And Viola Davis Embody Black Excellence On Their Entertainment Weekly Covers

1. Her Character From How to Get Away With Murder Had Everyone Wanting to Be A Detective

It’s no questioning how the show How to Get Away With Murder got to be so popular. Viola Davis’ character had everyone signing up to become a detective. It’s no wonder why the show is already in its 6th season. 

2. Let’s Not Forget About Her Famous Snot Bubble

If there’s one thing that changed cinema, it’s Viola Davis’ role in Fences. Rose Maxson’s gentle and nurturing character seems almost refreshing and very much needed for viewers to contrast Troy Maxson’s toughness. Although the couple experiences the same struggle, it is Rose’s grace that viewers admire most in the film. Can you say, best-supporting actress? 

3. She Made Us Love Her With Her Uplifting Affirmations in the ‘Help’

Viola won our hearts and many awards with her role as Aibileen Clark in ‘The Help. Despite Davis’ dissatisfaction with the film’s take on African Americans, Clark’s character lifts everyone around her, including her boss’ daughter, who wasn’t always nice in return.
 
 
 

4. Out of All the Villains in Suicide Squad, Amanda Waller’s Character May Be The Most Bad A$$ Of Them All

Viola won our hearts and many awards with her role as Aibileen Clark in The Help. Despite Davis’ dissatisfaction with the film’s take on African Americans, Clark’s character lifts everyone around her, including her boss’ daughter, who wasn’t always nice in return.